NetSuite Blog

Everything listed under: Ecommerce

  • Managing Marketplace Commerce with NetSuite

    You’ve likely heard the saying, “keep your friends close and your enemies closer.” That’s the way merchants need to start thinking about marketplaces. Instead of trying to compete against marketplace giants, you can use these channels to increase brand awareness, acquire new customers, expand globally, improve search engine optimization (SEO) and boost sales.

  • NetSuite Launches the Latest Tools to Power Growth with 17.2 Release

    It’s that time of the year again – NetSuite’s next release. As a true cloud solution, NetSuite upgrades all accounts twice a year – typically in Q1 and Q3. Our customers benefit from always being on the latest release with the ability to use the latest technologies and capabilities to help drive their businesses forward. We are excited to announce the new 17.2 Release of NetSuite.

  • How Technology is Enabling Family Businesses to Thrive in the World of Digital Commerce

    In 1989, Peg and Tim Liebert founded a mail-order company they called Kansas Sampler. The catalog was filled with apparel and gifts related to the state of Kansas and local sports teams. In 1990, they expanded into brick-and-mortar retailing by opening five stores in the Kansas City area. Fast-forward to 2017 - the family-owned business, under the name Rally House is operating over 60 stores in nine states and a growing ecommerce site with son Aaron Liebert leading the helm.

  • NetSuite Named a Leader in The Forrester Wave™: B2B Commerce Suites for Midsize Organizations, Q3 2017

    We’ve witnessed the B2B commerce landscape rapidly change over the last few years. Today’s B2B buyers want convenience and the same user-friendly experience they’re used to from their B2C shopping experiences. For companies to be successful, they must provide an online experience that meets business buyers’ complex requirements and rising expectations.

  • Your Digital Doorstep: Website Design Tips for B2B Ecommerce

    The first time customers arrive at your company’s digital doorstep, they make an evaluation of your brand unconsciously, in a fraction of a second. In that first glance, visitors judge the credibility of your site based on the design elements. They haven’t yet read any content, compared prices or seen your competitive shipping services -- they form a gut feeling about your brand; and then, if they decide to stay on your site, they’ll look for ways to justify that feeling.

  • VHC Brands Saves Business and Thrives in the NetSuite Cloud

    When the Kline family moved their home textile company VHC Brands to Branson, Missouri in the ‘90s, they thought their biggest concern would be tornadoes. But in October 2016, a fire sparked in the warehouse filled with blankets, pillows and rugs and everything went up in flames. “We were totally gone,” said Ken Kline, CEO of VHC Brands.

  • How Big Agnes is Taking Customers on an Online Camping Adventure

    Buy a new sleeping bag from your mobile phone, submit and track a repair for your tent or get some tips on camping with kids. These are just a few of the features transforming the customer experience on BigAgnes.com. The manufacturer of camping gear and apparel has traded in its home-grown ecommerce platform for SuiteCommerce Advanced. However, Big Agnes thinks of the new site as more than just a place to sell its products.

  • Cloud Commerce Changes the Game for Soccer Express

    With the vast geography of Canada, and the decline of the local mom-and-pop soccer shops, Soccer Express saw a need to revamp its business model to focus online. However, its disparate technology systems were holding them back from going full speed into omnichannel success. “We had a tremendous amount of manual and duplication of work,” said Andrew Veer, Chief Operating Officer at Soccer Express. 

  • Online Home Improvement Distributor Builds its Foundation for Success

    When online retailer DIY Home Center was getting started, cloud software was in its infancy. Like many other companies, it was using QuickBooks for accounting and had built its own ecommerce site and product information system (PIM).By 2015, DIY Home Center was running on about six disparate systems that weren’t easily connecting -- causing manual work across the company.